HOW ASIA CAN BENEFIT AS TRUMP PRESIDENCY PUTS DISTANCE BETWEEN AUSTRALIA AND THE US

Sunday, 18 December 2016

Donald’s Trump’s unexpected swerve on the one-China policy has reignited the post-election debate over Australia’s US-centred foreign policy, torn as it is between its top trading partner China and its main ally and security guarantor America.

Ever since Trump was elected president, Australia has, for the first time in more than a decade, been witnessing a split from the bipartisan view of both major parties that the US is central to Australian interests. Senator Penny Wong, who is the shadow foreign minister of the opposition Labor Party, has said that the uncertainty created by Donald Trump also presents an opportunity for Australia to question the centrality of the Australia, New Zealand, United States Security Treaty, or ANZUS, to Australia. She is advocating stronger engagement in Asia by Australia.

Caught between China and US, what Australia has to fear from a Trump presidency

Former prime minister Paul Keating says Australia should “cut the tag” with the US and pursue better engagement with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) instead. Greens leader Senator Richard Di Natale says he believes the US is now a threat. Though disengagement from the US has long been central to Green policy, Trump’s election has given it a new impetus.